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Cash flow Tips – How we achieved steady cash flow for our client

Cash flow Tips – How we achieved steady cash flow for our client

Cash flow Tips – How we achieved steady cash flow for our client

One client was struggling – feast and famine with money coming in then drying up and bills to pay!! He couldn’t achieve steady cashflow because he was pulled with all the many tasks a growing business owner must juggle! WE have found a system that improves getting paid and is more consistent than the old traditional monthly statement and phone call method of traditional business practice.

How he was going under

One week he could get on top of who owed him what, and what he owed, then he was out of touch again within a week with calls, quotes, staff issues, client issues and so on. He’d stay up after the children and wife were in bed and it was quiet, to concentrate and get back on track – but it was making him more tired and he was being drained.

How he bit the bullet and solved the problem

  • He decided to call us back in for regular help – that would free him up to work on what he did well, and win more clients to grow his business!
  • We got all his bills to pay, nagged him to check all his emails and that all bills were emailed to our account email, and entered them in the software – about 10-15 min work – now there is a list of what is due, and when! Up to date!
  • We reconciled the bank for the last month, checked where it was at because the accountant’s office was reconciling it monthly. And checked that the last quarter was correct, as some invoices were of the same $ but remittances from clients said they paid different ones and not always the oldest! Re-did some payments, aligned the correct ones paid. Up to date!
  • We synchronized the project software with his accounts software, and checked the 2 systems had the same invoices due, by number and $ – the invoices exported into the accounts software, but unfortunately the accounts can’t update paid invoices back into the project software – hopefully this will be rectified in time! Up to date!
  • Filed all paid invoices, checking back on the bank when paid and marking clearly as paid, then put in folder alphabetically.
  • Reported on clients due – debtors – accounts receivable, in an aged report to be able to easily see what was overdue – the business had 7 day terms – of course many larger businesses ignore and still pay on 30 day cycles! There were 12 well over due, 5 just a day over due, and 10 not due as yet
  • Reminders – emailed all over due outstanding receivables with a friendly tone, and “REMINDER” at the start of the subject message so it stood out
  • System – send reminders FORTNIGHLY – not monthly! It’s too long and people forget! And for those well over due – WEEKLY email reminders

RESULT

  • Over 3 weeks the old 12 outstanding accounts were up to date except 1!
  • Only 1 client needed to be called after several reminders, excuses, requests for invoices again by accounts – the usual delay tactics that indicate possible cashflow issues!
  • Regular clients realised we were on to them straight after the 7 days due!
  • 70-80% now pay before, on time, or a day or two after the time due!
  • Client has regular income to cover expenses
  • Client is sleeping better and serving prospective and new clients with more enthusiasm and energy!
  • Low costs – all this weekly for under a few hundred dollars!!!
  • Peace of mind with professionals handling what they can do very well!

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

0407 361 596 Aust

Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia

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Business Tips – How recognition of employees helps your business and should be the TOP priority

Business Tips – How recognition of employees helps your business and should be the TOP priority

How recognition of employees helps your business and should be the TOP priority

Recognition of Employees should be a top priority of your business – both for the benefit of them and for the business health and happiness! Here are some findings from research and authorities – around the globe and Australia (our emphasis added) –

Stuart Hearn at business.com writes – A recent workplace study conducted by Clear Review, a performance review software system, found the number one workplace frustration to be a lack of appreciation regarding effort and performance. A remarkable 40 percent of employees, from a diverse range of fields and positions, stated that employee recognition was simply not a priority in their business, something that limited their motivation to truly excel.
We have known for a long time that employee recognition is a critical aspect of performance management. As a result, many companies make it a point to acknowledge employee performance during monthly check-ins. But how can employee recognition benefit a company? And how can you give your employees the appreciation they deserve?
Employee recognition improves engagement levels
Many sources will attest to the fact that recognition is a fundamental human need. In order to feel engaged at work, we need to know that what we are doing actually matters, and that it is appreciated. Without this knowledge, employees consider their role purposeless, and employee engagement levels within your organization will plummet. In fact, recognition has consistently been shown to be a top engagement driver. If, however, you dedicate time and resources toward developing an employee recognition program, employees will become more loyal and positive toward their company.
To further demonstrate the effect of recognition on employee engagement, we can look to the following facts and figures:
An Australian Company, Red Balloon, performs quarterly surveys and in one report finds –
There are six basics or standards required to deliver on expectations and start to engage a workforce; our suggestion is that organisations that do not include these activities as part of their engagement mix stand little chance of breaking past average levels of engagement.
  • Training and Development Programs
  • Recognition Programs
  • Non-Cash Rewards & Incentives
Training and Development is of particular interest as organisations that do not invest in it are highly unlikely to have an employee engagement score of over 40.
  • Parental Leave
  • Time off for Study
  • Flexible Working Arrangements
These last three activities are core ingredients of engagement because organisations scoring <40% are just as likely to invest in them as 80%+ organisations. Investing in them is now a standard that has little uplift in terms of engagement scores but would definitely have a negative effect if not invested in or taken away once they were in place.
What are your thoughts and experience?
Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!
Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!
Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Business Tips – How Recognition of employees helps your business and should be the TOP priority

Business Tips – How Recognition of employees helps your business and should be the TOP priority

Business Tips – How Recognition of employees helps your business and should be the TOP priority

Recognition of Employees should be a top priority of your business – both for the benefit of them and for the business health and happiness! Here are some findings from research and authorities – around the globe and Australia (our emphasis added) –

Stuart Hearn at business.com writes – A recent workplace study conducted by Clear Review, a performance review software system, found the number one workplace frustration to be a lack of appreciation regarding effort and performance. A remarkable 40 percent of employees, from a diverse range of fields and positions, stated that employee recognition was simply not a priority in their business, something that limited their motivation to truly excel.

We have known for a long time that employee recognition is a critical aspect of performance management. As a result, many companies make it a point to acknowledge employee performance during monthly check-ins. But how can employee recognition benefit a company? And how can you give your employees the appreciation they deserve?

Employee recognition improves engagement levels

Many sources will attest to the fact that recognition is a fundamental human need. In order to feel engaged at work, we need to know that what we are doing actually matters, and that it is appreciated. Without this knowledge, employees consider their role purposeless, and employee engagement levels within your organization will plummet. In fact, recognition has consistently been shown to be a top engagement driver. If, however, you dedicate time and resources toward developing an employee recognition program, employees will become more loyal and positive toward their company.

To further demonstrate the effect of recognition on employee engagement, we can look to the following facts and figures:

  • Businesses that spend as little as 1 percent of payroll on recognition have a 79 percent greater likelihood of seeing more positive financial results.

 

An Australian Company, Red Balloon, performs quarterly surveys and in one report finds –

There are six basics or standards required to deliver on expectations and start to engage a workforce; our suggestion is that organisations that do not include these activities as part of their engagement mix stand little chance of breaking past average levels of engagement.

  • Training and Development Programs
  • Recognition Programs
  • Non-Cash Rewards & Incentives

Training and Development is of particular interest as organisations that do not invest in it are highly unlikely to have an employee engagement score of over 40.

  • Parental Leave
  • Time off for Study
  • Flexible Working Arrangements

These last three activities are core ingredients of engagement because organisations scoring <40% are just as likely to invest in them as 80%+ organisations. Investing in them is now a standard that has little uplift in terms of engagement scores but would definitely have a negative effect if not invested in or taken away once they were in place.

What are your thoughts and experience?

Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / Strategy session today!

Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Cashflow Tips – What is the meaning of, & what does a Cashflow Statement show?

Cashflow Tips – What is the meaning of, & what does a Cashflow Statement show?

Cashflow Tips – What is the meaning of, & what does a Cashflow Statement show?

The Cashflow Statement is also called the Statement of Cashflows, and here we explain the meaning of, and look at what the statement shows us. It is one of the 3 main financial statements that businesses report on – the other 2 are Profit & Loss, and the Balance Sheet.

The cash flow statement reports the actual cash generated and used during the time interval stated in its heading. The period of time that the statement covers is chosen by the company, for example, “For the Three Months Ended 31 December, 2015” or “The Fiscal Year Ended September 30, 2016”. Most common is annual.

The cash flow statement actually uses data and the CHANGES between periods from the Profit & Loss and Balance Sheet, and organises and reports the cash generated and used in the following categories:

Operating, Investing and Financial activities

Business Cash Flow

What the Cashflow Statement shows

The profit & loss or Income Statement is prepared under the accrual basis of accounting, meaning the sales/revenues reported may not have been collected yet. Similarly, the expenses reported on the income statement might not have been paid. You could review the balance sheet changes to determine the facts, but the cash flow statement already has integrated all that information. As a result, savvy business people and investors utilize this important financial statement.

Here are a few ways the statement of cash flows is used.

  1. The cash from operating activities is compared to the company’s net income (profit/loss). If the cash from operating activities is consistently greater than the net income, the company’s net income or earnings are said to be of a “high quality“. If the cash from operating activities is less than net income, a red flag is raised as to why the reported net income is not turning into cash.
  2. Some investors believe that “cash is king”. The cash flow statement identifies the cash that is flowing in and out of the company. If a company is consistently generating more cash than it is using, the company will be able to increase its dividend, buy back some of its stock, reduce debt, or acquire another company. All of these are seen to be good for shareholder value.
  3. There are also some financial models that use the cash flow.

The statement of cash flows has four distinct sections:

  1. Cash generated from operating activities
  2. Cash generated from investing activities
  3.  Cash generated from financing activities
  4. Supplemental information.

The differences in a company’s balance sheet accounts from one period to the next, will provide much of the needed information. The changes—or differences—in the account balances will likely be entered in one of the sections of the statement of cash flows.

Of the four sections of the statement of cash flows, those balance sheet accounts which affect each section include –

1. Operating Activities

This section reports the net income and then converts it from the accrual basis to the cash basis by using the changes in the balances of current asset and current liability accounts, such as:

  • Accounts Receivable
  • Inventory
  • Prepaid Insurance
  • Other Current Assets
  • Notes Payable
  • Accounts Payable
  • Wages Payable
  • Payroll Liabilities
  • Interest Payable
  • Income Taxes Payable
  • Unearned Revenues
  • Other Current Liabilities

Note – as well as using the changes in current assets and current liabilities, the operating activities section may list adjustments for depreciation expense and for the gains and losses on the sale of long-term assets/investments.

2. Investing Activities

This section reports changes in the balances of long-term asset accounts, such as:

  • Long-term Investments
  • Land
  • Buildings
  • Equipment
  • Furniture & Fixtures
  • Vehicles

Investing activities involve the purchase and/or sale of long-term investments and property, plant, and equipment.

3. Financing Activities

This section reports changes in balances of the long-term liability and stockholders’ equity accounts, such as:

  • Notes Payable (generally due after one year)
  • Bonds Payable
  • Deferred Income Taxes
  • Preferred Stock
  • Paid-in Capital in Excess of Par-Preferred Stock
  • Common Stock
  • Paid-in Capital in Excess of Par-Common Stock
  • Paid-in Capital from Treasury Stock
  • Retained Earnings
  • Treasury Stock

Financing activities involve the issuance and/or the repurchase of a company’s own bonds or shares as well as short-term and long-term borrowings and repayments.

4. Supplemental Information

This section of the cash flow statement reports the amount of interest and income taxes paid as well as significant exchanges not involving cash. For example, the exchange of company shares for company bonds would be reported here.

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Business Tips – 21 best business advice tips for success by small business owners who are killing it – news.com.au

Business Tips – 21 best business advice tips for success by small business owners who are killing it – news.com.au

21 best business advice tips for success by small business owners who are killing it – news.com.au

Here are 21 great business tips to get your enthusiasm back and get you focused on what you want to achieve in your business, by Emma Reynolds at news.com.au

STARTING a small business is a dream for many Australians, but it can be daunting.

Here, entrepreneurs who are killing it in a range of industries share their best piece of advice for making your company a success.

1. Deliver a consistent customer experience

Damian Cerini, owner of cycling tour business Tour de Vines, says you need your business to almost run itself before you look at growth. “The thing about working for an employer is that the business model is already set, it’s about the execution of the idea, whereas a new business is about testing the idea first and developing the systems.”

2. Add a personal touch

Angus Askew, co-director of commercial asset financing company Magnolia Lane Financial Services, says: “In our industry like most service industries everyone is essentially selling the same thing, you’ve just got to do it better. Our number one goal when dealing with a new client is to establish a relationship and make them feel special. Make sure you are remembered. We make it our priority to see all of our customers face to face. Create a rapport as this is what will result in repeat business and an income stream for life.”

3. Leverage social media

A strong marketing strategy is essential in every industry, says Anthony Kittel, director of manufacturing firm REDARC. That means social networking — on LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook or all of the above. “Our brand is everything, so whatever we can do to promote that brand and consumer awareness is critical.”

21 tips Kelly Exeter

Author and Flying Solo editor Kelly Exeter says a less frantic life made her more productive.

4. Write your own business bible

Matthew White, whose firm Ergoflex sells memory foam mattresses, says the volume of information available can be overwhelming. He recommends writing ideas and tips in a notebook or tablet as they come up. “It has helped me make some major decisions, and also saved me hours of searching for something I’ve read somewhere.”

5. Focus on your specialty

In the first few years, there can be a lot of pressure to diversify your offering, says Paris Cutler, director of cake decorating company Planet Cake. “Stick to what you do best and do it better and with more focus than anyone else.”

6. Outsource the things you don’t do

Resist the temptation to chase work outside your offering, and use a specialist to fill in any gaps, says Rhys Roberts from accountancy firm Viridity. “I outsource my HR, my IT, much of my marketing and more. The time you free up you can spend doing what you are good at.”

7. Aim high and be persistent

Determination is one of the vital qualities needed when you start on the long road of setting up a small business. Rochelle Miller, co-founder of fashion retailer Another Love, says: “Believe in yourself and your strengths. Don’t take ‘no’ for an answer. There will be bumps along the way, but everything has a solution or another option.”

21 tips Andrew Griffiths

Consultant Andrew Griffiths thinks about ways to improve his business each day.

8. Embrace a life less frantic

Kelly Exeter, author and editor of small business community Flying Solo says it’s all about finding the right balance for you. “I am learning that I don’t just need physical space to thrive, I need mental space too.”

9. Follow your own path

Designer and illustrator Beci Orpin says she’s not naturally business-minded, but has always worked really hard and built up a strong folio of work. “My business is all about me: my style and what I create, so an important part of developing that was staying true to myself — not worrying about what other people were doing.”

10. Take time out to think about how to improve

Use your best hour in the day to consider ways of moving forward, advises Andrew Griffiths, a small business author and consultant. He does this first thing every morning. Then, each Friday, “I find a quiet place and ask myself a question: ‘How is my business better this week than it was last week?’”

11. Harness your ‘keystone habits’

Entrepreneur and blogger James Clear says we should find the one or two habits or routines that make everything else fall into place. “Improving your lifestyle and becoming the type of person who ‘has their act together’ isn’t nearly as hard as you might think.”

21 tips Kathryn Hocking

Life coach Kathryn Hocking researches what competitors are doing.

12. Practice mindfulness

Freelance journalist and editor Jodie Macleod says it increases productivity, reduces stress and improves memory and focus. “Mindfulness is when you are aware of your thoughts, feelings, sensations, breath and everything occurring in the present moment, without attaching judgment to those observations.”

13. Every setback is a stepping stone to success

Lucinda Lions from branding agency Slogan Creator says it’s important to stay positive wherever possible, and see feedback, not failure. “I remind myself tomorrow is a brand new day, a new opportunity to think differently and make better choices.”

14. Hire from within your networks

When Sarah Wilson from I Quit Sugarbegan feeling overwhelmed with work, she decided to get an assistant. She put a call out to her community, knowing taking someone on would involve sacrifice. Five years later, they still have a successful working relationship. “Start out small and then leave the invitation open for expansion.”

15. Keep it manageable

Kate James, start-up coach at Total Balance, says it’s important to remember that it’s not all about non-stop growth — bigger isn’t better if you’ve stopped enjoying what you do. “You need to define your own version of success. Mine is that I need to love my business.”

21 tips Sarah Wilson

Sarah Wilson says you need to know when to ask for help.Source:Supplied

16. Know when to work for free

Vanessa Emilio from Legal123, says sometimes working for free is worth it. “‘Free’ doesn’t mean offering an entire job or product for free. It could mean a free initial consultation, free component of a project or complimentary muffin with every coffee.”

17. Stay excited and believe in your business

SEO copywriter and consultant Kate Toon says start-ups should think about clients’ needs and possible issues and create rational responses to persuade them your business is the solution. “Inject warmth, professionalism and even humour, where appropriate. Being human beats boring every time.”

18. Learn to say no

Recognise when a client has unrealistic expectations and nip it in the bud early, or consider referring them on, says author and media commentator Andrew Griffiths.

Try a formal, structured response and keep returning to it. Try, “Thank you for the opportunity, but we are so heavily committed we can’t give your project the time and attention it needs.”

19. Create fans

If you’re on a tight marketing budget, think about how you can trigger word-of-mouth interest. Warren Harmer of The Business Plan Company mentions a small florist that did this brilliantly by 1) Offering quality; 2) Providing value; 3) Inspiring team members to love their job and clients and 4) Creating a physical environment that excited their market.

20. Turn competition into inspiration

Life coach Kathryn Hocking suggests you research what competitors are doing to help identify what makes you unique. Your relationship doesn’t have to be adversarial: they could be a mentor, partner or friend. “Focus on your own purpose and connect with peers that have similar values and who inspire you to greater levels of success.”

21. Know when to take a ‘dream detour’

Sometimes it’s hard to know whether to grab a fresh opportunity or stick to your path. Business mentor Lynda Bayada says you need to outsmart your head so you can listen to your heart. “Give yourself space and trust yourself. And you’ll find that’s half the battle won.”

“What is your tip? Consider posting a review or comment for us below!”

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Cashflow Tips – I’m making a profit but no cash – why does this happen?

Cashflow Tips – I’m making a profit but no cash – why does this happen?

Cashflow Tips – I’m making a profit but no cash – why does this happen?

Is your business making a profit but no cash and you wonder why?

This may be because company reports like Profit & Loss may show you are making a profit but have no cash because profit is an accounting record using revenues and expenses, (accrual accounting) which are different from the company’s cash receipts and cash disbursements (cash accounting).

Put another way, there is a difference between revenues (invoiced sales) and receipts (actual cash receipt of payment of invoices (banked)). There is also a difference between expenses (purchase orders still to pay) and expenditures (actual payment of purchases, and overhead expenses).

Examples

  1. As an example a new company that sells $10,000 to its clients in a month and the clients are given 30 days to pay. The company will have $10,000 of revenues in its first month, but the cash will not be received until the second month. If the company’s expenses are $7,000 in the first month, the company will report a profit of $3,000 but will not have received any cash from its clients. It may not have been paid, and it may not have paid its expenses either.
  2. Another company might report a profit of $60,000 in its first year, but during its first year it uses $65,000 of cash to acquire equipment that will be put into service at the beginning of the second year. This company will have a profit, but will not have the cash.
  3. Other times cash is paid out, but the profits are not reduced at the time of the payment, because they don’t pay for expenses but pay loans, payroll PAYG or super or for stock – they go to the Balance Sheet and include prepayments of insurance, payments to increase the inventory of merchandise on hand, and payments to reduce liabilities.

Keep in mind that Profit does not equal cash: It is as simple as that!

Profit is the accounting record of what is left after you have made sales and raised all expenses. Of course, remember there is tax on the profit as well. The remaining amount is then reinvested back into the business or distributed to the owners.

Cash is what the business needs to operate every day and can come from 5 different main sources — profit, selling assets, contributing your own personal funds, bank loans or new investor money.

Cash and Timing

The key to remember is that you don’t spend profit in our business — you spend cash, and it is all in the timing.

There are 2 timing situations to be aware of –

Firstly as the old saying goes, you have to spend money to make money. To make a profit, you first need to purchase goods or services to sell, so you will need cash before the sale is made. By selling your product or service at a higher price than what it cost, you make a profit.  The point is you need the cash before you get the profit, or get credit and pay the supplier later!

Secondly (that catches most businesses) is providing credit to customers. The longer the customer takes to pay, the longer you have to wait for the cash, and in the meantime you have wages, rent, stock and other expenses to pay. This is where the trouble begins and often ends.

Focus on what matters – cashflow

You need to focus on not only profit but also what drives your cashflow. If you have regular loan repayments, rent and other expenses that have to be made on time, then you will need enough cash to cover these while you wait for your customers to pay. Keeping track of your accounts receivable and following up on late payments will definitely help your cashflow. The other thing to remember is if you can get credit from your suppliers, this may mean that you don’t have to pay for stock until you have sold it — again making a big difference to your cash flow.

The business needs to be profitable to stay in business. Be careful of sacrificing profits to generate cash. Offering discounts to pay early will definitely help your cash position but will reduce your profit.

The best management is to make sure you have enough cash buffer to cover ongoing expenses. Having a finance facility (overdraft, credit card) can help that will tide you over during a cash flow shortage, but this will cost in the form of fees and interest, which again, will reduce your profit.

Remember profit does not equal cash!

See more help at Cashflow Tips

If we helped solve your problem, please consider posting a review or comment for us!

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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MYOB – Year End Business Tax Planning – Support to prepare the books/accounts well! MYOB Account Right

Support to prepare the books/accounts well! MYOB Account Right

Support to prepare the books/accounts well! MYOB Account Right

MYOB have a huge amount of resources to assist you in better books for your accountant, but more importantly for you to have an accurate set of books to UNDERSTAND and gain INSIGHT to MANAGE your business BETTER! Your books and accounts are a treasure-trove of information that tell you about the health of your business and what areas you can work on to improve your business financial results!

EOFY – End of Financial Year key dates

A great tool is this calendar where you can select the date to see key compliance tasks and actions that need to be taken – click this image – 

MYOB Key dates 2017

MYOB Account Right

There are End-of-year procedures that need to be carried out to prepare your company file for the coming year. By reconciling and completing the year in your company file, you are effectively bringing the company file up to date.

These include any adjustments you need to make to your company file so that it agrees with your accountant’s final records before you start a new year.

Your payroll, invoices, purchases statement reconciliations as well as finally your inventory should be counted, valued and, where necessary, adjusted in your company file.

The MYOB End of Period page is where you begin. The resources include end of Month, Financial and Payroll Year things that you should do. Overall it’s about checking the accounting records to ensure they are complete, accurate and reconciled to key support documents such as bank and credit card statements.

Other helpful Links

MYOB Essentials

For users of MYOB Essentials, see the end of year video on what to do. You can also find  FAQs and The Help Centre there.

http://help.myob.com.au/teachme/webcasts/essentials/index2.htm

Software Upgrades

You will be able to download the current update directly from Updates within the MYOB Account Right software in many versions, or from this page.

Want help with upgrading? – do you need to talk about what is available without obligation or any pressure? Then call Paul! 0407 361 596

Get a FREE 30 min answer to your query, and FREE ongoing email or phone support – No-one offers as much! Call and you also get FREE Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right! Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia