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Bookkeeping – Motor Vehicle Assets – How to set up cars in accounting records

Business Tax Tips / Bookkeeping – Motor Vehicle Assets – How to set up cars in accounting records

Business Tax Tips / Bookkeeping – Motor Vehicle Assets – How to set up cars in accounting records

Client emailedOur Company bought 2 cars  –

  • Holden Cruze for $16,700.00 includes GST/stamp duty/transfer fee          
  • Barina for $12,888.00

We traded in the company car – Holden Commodore for $3000 and the wife’s car for $1500. Daniel has not claimed the $1500 but gave it to the business.

Now both ’new’ cars belong to the company.

Invoice for Holden Cruze is $16,700.00

The $4,500 trade in was netted out of the purchase of the Barina so the invoice is

($12,888- $4,500) $8,388.00 net.

We have in our accounts:-

MV @ cost                             18539.37

MV Accum Depn                  15412.00

Please advise. Thank you.

How to EnterTo keep things simple, we need to set up some new accounts (“NA”) for each motor vehicle, and new accounts for the loans on each car – it is then easiest to leave the final reconciliation and adjustments to your accountant year end.

I assume the 2 MV accounts are only for the Commodore and no other cars. It is good practice to create new accounts for EACH vehicle so the accountant can reconcile at year end with ease!

Separate the Rego (and Insur if included in the deal) from the $16,700 (or you can leave for accountant at year end to pick up).

AKP Case Study*Is the Loan a Chattel Mortgage? – Can mention type of loan in account name as well

Monthly payments – for simplicity, allocate from bank to NA Liability MVeh Loan Fin Co Name (the new finance account).

The old car accounts – Asset MVehicle @ Cost Commodore, and the MV Accum Dep can be left for the accountant to calculate and adjust at year end, in case there are other adjustments he needs to do.

For other examples of entering MV assets in the accounts, see –

Quickbooks – How to go about setting Chattel Mortgage up and accounting for the monthly payments in Quickbooks.

Another Asset Example – How to enter assets in the books

How do I show liabilities for the total borrowed including interest, not just the principle/asset amount?

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

0407 361 596 Aust

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Business Tax Tips – Reducing Red tape in Australia

Business Tax Tips – Reducing Red Tape In Australia

Reducing Red Tape In Australia

Did you know there is a current 4 year plan where the ATO is working hard at reducing red tape in Australia for tax payers?

The ATO says at Reducing red tape Reforms to the Australian Taxation Office

In the 2015–16 Budget, the Government announced it will provide funding over four years to deliver an improved experience for clients in their dealings with the Australian Taxation Office (ATO).

Red tape will be reduced and future administrative savings delivered through investment in three foundational initiatives: a digital by default service for provision of information and making payments, improvements to data and analytics infrastructure and enhancing streamlined income tax returns through the my Tax system for taxpayers with more complex tax affairs.

The package of service improvements supports the Government’s commitment to reduce red tape and forms part of the Government’s digital transformation agenda.

This measure delivers on the Government’s election commitment.

Click for links with information on the legislation

A detailed website on tracking the initiative is https://www.cuttingredtape.gov.au/  – It says –

The Government has committed to reducing the cost of unnecessary or inefficient regulation imposed on individuals, business and community organisations by at least $1 billion a year. An important part of this commitment is the development of a Framework to review the performance of Commonwealth regulators.

This Framework isn’t just for regulators. It will benefit business and the community, including individuals. Find out more.

What are YOUR thoughts and experiences? Comment below! Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

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Bookkeeping – Holiday/Annual Leave Payout deducts from the Accrual, but Holiday Cash Out doesn’t – Why? (Updated Article)

Bookkeeping – Holiday/annual leave payout deducts from the accrual, but holiday cash out doesn’t – Why?

Bookkeeping – Holiday/annual leave payout deducts from the accrual, but holiday cash out doesn’t – Why?

( 31 Aug 2017 – Information corrected, due to Sue’s advice in comments below – I learn new tricks every day, even when right before you !!! Thanks Sue!)

Client Skype’d Hi Paul, I’ve had a look and our special Pay Category, Holiday Cash Out doesn’t seem to be deducting from the balance of Holiday Leave Accrual. It’s not listed under entitlements under the Payroll Category List window.

Answer – Yes it is NOT linked to the accrual entitlement because it may only have one wage category (can be) linked (at a time to a) to the pay wage category – the Holiday/Annual Leave wage pay category that is regularly used, is linked to the Holiday Accrual and deducts from the accrual – if you go to Entitlements, and then open the Holiday Leave Accrual, you will see down at the bottom it says it is linked to Holiday Leave.

Your Holiday Cash Out is not an a usual entitlement (only with some awards) – it will be under the Wages Payroll Category to be used when paid :), but it has no effect on the accrual if not linked – until linked.

Client Skype’d – Thanks. So how do we reduce the accrued holiday leave by the hours that have been paid as a holiday cash out which is allowed in the award, up to 2 weeks per year? Can we put it as an entitlement that gets deducted or can we manually deduct from accrued holiday pay?

Answer – You tick it to link to the Holiday Leave Entitlement Accrual at the bottom for linked cateories! It needs be manually deducted – the more automatic way is to set up the Hol Cash Out as a separate entitlement, and choose to link it to the Holiday Cash Out wage category.

BUT – If the 2 weeks are optional and it is linked to the Accrual, it will adjust the hours WHEN Holiday is cashed out – automatically adjusted for you! it will be difficult to balance with the regular Holiday accrual if not taken every year – it becomes messy – if not used regularly but occasional years.

(with this correction of the info, past Cashed Out Holiday still needs to be adjusted to the Holiday Accrual as follows –

I would adjust the Accrual in this way – do a paycheque with ZERO hours, and in the lower lines at Holiday Accrual, adjust the holiday accrual with NEGATIVE the hours cashed out, and write a note in the memo for the reason and date the cash out occurred, there should be no super generated, ensure any other allowances etc are ALL ZERO also – then record, and this pay updates the accrual and there is a clear record with note and date for the reason for the adjustment.

Client Skype’dOK I will try that. There’s only a few done so far. So will need to do that for those ones. May make an adjustment today so these are all done now and up to date. Thanks.

Answer – Yes, do as a pay, then it updates and provides a note and proper record on the staff pays record.

Client Skype’d –  Thanks. Is the other option to use the “Unused Holiday Pay” for Cashed Out pay as well?

Answer – NO Unused is for a different reason – when they leave and still have Unused Leave owing due to them on leaving. The Unused Holiday can ALSO be linked to the Holiday Accrual will ALSO NOT decrease the Holiday Accrual, but it is used to be clear what the pay is for – and when you enter the Termination Date in the card it closes OFF the entitlements.

Client Skype’d –  OK thanks. Thought I’d check. Will org. Cheers.

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Business Tax Tips – Taxable Payments Annual Report – Building Industry

Business Tax Tips – Taxable Payments Annual Report – Building Industry

Taxable Payments Annual Report – Building Industry

Are you a business in the building and construction industry? You will probably need to report the total payments you make to each contractor for building and construction services each year.

If you’re a business that is primarily in the building and construction industry, you need to report payments you make to contractors if both of the following apply:

  • you make payments to contractors for building and construction services
  • you have an Australian Business Number (ABN).

Contractors can be sole traders (individuals), companies, partnerships or trusts.

You need to report these payments to us on the Taxable Payments Annual Report by 28 August each year.

Activities and services that are considered to be building and construction are broad. Some examples include architectural work (including drafting and design), certification, decorating (including painting), engineering, landscaping and construction, project management and surveying.

Payments you need to report

Report only payments you make to contractors for building and constructions services.

Contractors can be sole traders (individuals), companies, partnerships or trusts.

If invoices you receive include both labour and materials, whether itemised or combined, you report the whole amount of the payment, unless the labour component is only incidental.

The definition of building and construction services is broad – it includes any of the activities listed below if they are performed on, or in relation to, any part of a building, structure, works, surface or sub-surface:

  • alteration
  • assembly
  • construction
  • demolition
  • design
  • destruction
  • dismantling
  • erection
  • excavation
  • finishing
  • improvement
  • installation
  • maintenance (excluding the maintenance, service or repairs of equipment and tools)
  • management of building and construction services
  • modification
  • organisation of building and construction services
  • removal
  • repair (excluding the service or repairs of equipment and tools)
  • site preparation.

Get more details from the ATO website HERE             

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Business Tax Tips –GST Error Correction – How to put it right

Business Tax Tips –GST Error Correction – How to put it right

Business Tax Tips –GST Error Correction – How to put it right

On the Australian Tax Office (ATO) website has information on what to do when you find you have a GST error correction to make – and how to put it right in a way that is easier than revising a prior statement, as well as you can save penalties (see!… the ATO is really NOT your business enemy!)

Correcting GST Errors –

If you make a mistake (that fits the definition of a GST error) when reporting GST on an activity statement, you can correct that error on a later activity statement if you meet certain conditions.

The benefit of correcting a GST error on a later activity statement is that you will not be liable for any penalties or general interest charge (GIC) for that error.

Generally, it is easier to correct a GST error on a later activity statement than to revise an earlier activity statement. Revising an earlier activity statement that contains an error can incur penalties or GIC.

Here are a series of links about correcting GST errors –

o    options for correcting an error

o    definition of a GST error

o    types of GST errors

o    correcting credit errors

o    correcting debit errors

o    how to make corrections on a later activity statement

o    when a credit or debit error cannot be corrected on a later activity statement

o    what is not a GST error

o    example of correcting GST errors on a later activity statement

o    record keeping

o    more information.

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Bookkeeping – End of Financial year final pay falls in new financial year

Bookkeeping – End of Financial year final pay falls in new financial year

Bookkeeping – End of Financial year final pay falls in new financial year

Client questionJust a quick question. 

We have an employee being paid fortnightly.

Next payment to be made 07/07/2017.  This includes the week 26/6 to 30/6/2017. Does any of this have to be put through in EOFY for 2016/2017?  Or will it be first payment for New year on new tax table?

Solution Payroll is taken as  a cash payment in the accounts – ie WHEN it is paid.

Regardless of what period it covers – it is WHEN it is paid.

So not included in previous tax year.

You can finish your payroll YE17 year, prepare the Payment Summaries – check you include in Gross Payments, any NEW payroll types/categories if you created any during the year.

Then roll forward to new payroll year, and you can process the 7/7/17 payroll that covers end of June days and some of July days.

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

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Business Tax Tips – Small Business Tax Breaks To Help Your Business – 2017-18 Budget

Business Tax Tips – Small Business Tax Breaks To Help Your Business – 2017-18 Budget

Small Business Tax Breaks To Help Your Business – 2017-18 Budget

There are (still proposed) small business tax breaks to help your business soon to be finalised. From the ATO website, here are details of proposed changes to tax and superannuation legislation and policy, and how the ATO proposes to administer the changes. From the ATO website –

Budget 2017–18

The Government handed down the 2017–18 Budget on 9 May 2017, with several proposed changes to tax and superannuation laws. Below is a list of the announced measures. You can access the Budget papers here: budget.gov.au

The Treasury Laws Amendment (Enterprise Tax Plan) Bill 2016External Link has been passed by both houses, but is not yet law. The proposed Bill will do the following:

In the 2016–17 Budget, the Government announced that it intended to progressively reduce the corporate tax rate from 30 per cent to 25 per cent. These changes were outlined in the Enterprise Tax Plan 2016 Bill. Amendments were made to this Bill by the Senate on 31 March 2017. The amendments were accepted by the Government and received Royal Assent on 19 May 2017.

Treasury Laws Amendment (Enterprise Tax Plan No. 2) Bill 2017 was introduced to the House of Representatives on 11 May 2017 to increase the scope of which corporate entities would be eligible for the lower corporate tax rate in future years.

The corporate tax rate is reduced from 28.5% to 27.5% for the 2016–17 income year for small business entities. The aggregated turnover threshold to qualify as a small business has been increased from $2 million to $10 million.

In 2017–18 the threshold increases from $10 million to $25 million and in 2018–19 to $50 million. From 2017–18, corporate entities eligible for the lower tax rate will be known as base rate entities, i.e. the small business definition will remain at $10 million from 2017–18 onwards while the base rate entity threshold will continue to rise. Click for more info.

In the 2016-17 Budget, the Government announced an increase to the small business entity turnover threshold from $2 million to $10 million. From 1 July 2016, business with a turnover of less than $10 million will be able to access a range of concessions which are currently only available to business entities with a turnover of less than $2 million.

The current $2 million turnover threshold will be retained for access to the small business capital gains tax concessions.

Access to the unincorporated small business tax discount will be limited to entities with turnover less than $5 million.

We will accept tax returns as lodged during the period up until the outcome of the proposed amendment is known. Once the outcome of the proposed amendment is known taxpayers will need to review their positions back to their 2016-17 income year.

For what to do if the law is enacted or if it is not, click here

In the 2016–17 Budget, the Government announced an increase to the tax discount for unincorporated small businesses incrementally over 10 years from 5 per cent to 16 per cent.

From 1 July 2016, the tax discount will increase to 8 per cent, remain constant at 8 per cent for eight years, then increase to 10 per cent in 2024–25, 13 per cent in 2025–26 and reach a new permanent discount of 16 per cent in 2026–27.

The increases will coincide with staggered cuts in the corporate tax rate for certain entities to 25 per cent. The current cap of $1,000 per individual for each income year will be retained.

The tax discount applies to the income tax payable on the business income received from an unincorporated small business entity. The discount is provided by way of a small business income tax offset which you claim in your individual tax return.

From 1 July 2016, the discount will be extended to individual taxpayers with business income from an unincorporated business that has an aggregated annual turnover of less than $5 million.

Administrative treatment

The ATO will accept all tax returns as lodged during the period up until the law change is passed by Parliament.

What to do if the law is passed or not, click here.

For a list of all the Measures, click here.

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