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Cashflow Tips – Ways to raise cash for business – Some business cashflow tips

Cashflow Tips - Ways to raise cash for business – Some business cashflow tips

Cashflow Tips – Ways to raise cash for business – Some business cashflow tips

Handy ways to raise cash for business – some cashflow tips from an Australian Entrepreneur, Brad Sugars

1.  Know your expenses when discounting
Although discounting — through coupon sites like Groupon and BuyWithMe or even on your own — can help you attract new customers, selling anything at a loss won’t help you generate a positive cash flow.
My view? Never discount. But if you do, know the costs and impact of what you’re offering and be prepared for the fallout. Among other things, you’ll need to know your overall cost basis — that is, what you paid for something. You should also know your how much you should ideally charge, the cost of your offer and the profit margins on your product or service. How else will you know if your discount has you breaking even or operating at a loss?

2.  Bundle products and services
Even though discounting isn’t always recommended, adding value is. By creating bundles of products or services, for instance, businesses can inject tremendous amounts of perceived — and tangible — value into their offerings for very little cost.
A good example is the maintenance agreements some car manufacturers are now providing with the purchase of a new car. Not only does that type of offer help allay a major concern or frustration customers have – paying for a breakdown or time lost at the dealership – it also offers real value in terms of limiting out-of-pocket maintenance costs.
Put more simply, you can increase your price point initially since you’ve helped lower a perceived risk by offering something as basic as a guarantee.

3.  Create a back-end product or service
If you know your initial offer to reel in new customers won’t be profitable (loss leader), find ways to create higher price points on back-end products or services. Perhaps the first hour of catering is free, but subsequent hours shoot up in price. Or maybe an attorney will agree to draft your will for less if she thinks you’re a likely candidate for estate-planning consultations in the future.

4.  Encourage repeat business
If you’re in a volume-driven business like retail, landing repeat shoppers is your holy grail for cash flow, profit and growth. In most cases, you won’t start to profit on a customer until the third, fourth or even fifth transaction. For this reason, you need to devote your efforts toward getting customers coming back — and more often.
Consider loyalty programs, VIP offers and other frequent-shopper programs, which can be ideal vehicles for systematizing repeat business. Also keep in mind that the word “free” is a popular incentive among shoppers, and the costs of funding a freebie may easily be covered as long as you’re dealing with excess inventory or low-cost, but valuable add-ons.

5.  Pre-sell products or services
For owners who want to encourage sales sooner, pre-sell your products or services. You might couch the pre-sale as a way for consumers to plan for their future or get a jump on shopping. You can also offer to take old, out-dated products back at a pre-arranged price.

Taken from Entrepreneur article HERE

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Business Tips – Ideas to grow business sales

Business Tips – Ideas to grow business sales

Ideas to grow business sales

Here are a couple of ways your business can grow with some work and persistence!

Idea 1 – Add Complementary Products and Services
One way to increase sales and bring new customers to your sales base is adding new complementary products and services. But how do you decide what to add without turning your business into a third-rate department store?

Start by reviewing the definition of your business. For example, if you sell house siding, ask yourself, are you in the siding business or the exterior building materials business? The result may be that you redefine and expand your business to add gutters and downspouts, roofing and other coverings to your product line!
Another surprisingly simple way to build a list of new products or services is to ask your customers what else they might buy from you if your business sold it. A few friendly conversations with customers and staff will likely get you more information than thousands of dollars spent on professional customer surveys. Be sure to ask how much they would want to buy and how often to get a sense of whether the demand would be great enough to warrant the additional costs of building up this area of your business. (To learn how to build your network, read Small Business: It’s All About Relationships.)

Idea 2 – Look for New Market Niches
One way to find a new market niche is to seek alternative applications for your existing products and services, and we have a Cheez-y example of how this works. Kraft started out with a spreadable cheese product in a jar that could be spread on crackers for snacks – it was called Cheez Whiz. This was fine, but selling a cracker topping will only take you so far in this world. That’s why Kraft expanded the scope of Cheez Whiz and started promoting it as a base for a variety of dips and food toppings. Soon Cheez Whiz was an ingredient in all sorts of recipes. Kraft wasn’t satisfied with only human consumption though. One of the latest unique uses of Cheez Whiz comes from a California fishing lure and bait company that sells Cheez Whiz in a pre-packaged bait application, and it buys Cheez Whiz in 55 gallon drums!

If Kraft had stuck with the spreadable-cheese concept, sure, it would have covered a lot of crackers. But by thinking outside of its original intent, Kraft expanded the market and attracted customers it never would have targeted initially.

(Source and more Ideas Investopedia)

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Business Tax Tips – Starting a business – The tax and super responsibilities

Business Tax Tips – Starting a business – The tax and super responsibilities

Starting a business – The tax and super responsibilities

Starting a business? Do you know your tax and super responsibilities? The ATO (Australian Tax Office) have many things to support you with the running (and start-up) of your business.

Here is what is available with some explanation –

From ATO site

When you start a business, there are tax and super responsibilities you need to be aware of, including:

  • the tax implications of your business structure
  • whether you’re entitled to an ABN
  • registering your business
  • records you need to keep
  • deductions you can claim.

We provide information about the key things you need to know and do when starting your own business.

Find out about:

For your tax and super basics, this video is a good starting point:

AKP link 22-11-18

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Business Finance 101 – Research – How your accountant (and good bookkeeper) can help BOOST your business revenue!

Business Finance 101 – Research - How your accountant (and good bookkeeper) can help BOOST your business revenue!

Business – Research – How your accountant (and good bookkeeper) can help BOOST your business revenue!

Did you know research shows that for the third of business owners who worked with an accountant as an advisor, one in five (21%) saw a rise in their revenue over the last year.

Rose Powell reports in SMEs can make better use of their accountant to boost their bottom line – “Small business operators who used their accountant as a business advisor last year were 31% more likely to see an earning uplift, according to new research from the MYOB Business Monitor.

The vast majority of the 1005 business owners surveyed, 89% used an accountant last year.

Only 32% of owners reported having an advisory or consultative relationship with their accountant, compared with the 57% whose relationships were for compliance only, such as tax return completion or GST reporting. Just 11% did not have an accountant…. Adam Ferguson, general manager of the accountants division at MYOB, told StartupSmart that using an accountant as an advisor was especially valuable for start-up companies.

“The start-up phase of a business is very different to when it’s up and running. In that phase, your accountant can help with things like creating a business plan, applying for business loans, building out your business case,” says Ferguson.

For start-ups who are already in operational phase, the increasing use of cloud accounting systems enables accountants to provide feedback and ask the right questions about compliance and cash flow.

Ferguson says cloud accounting means compliance is no longer a year-end process, and increasingly a monthly one. This makes them well placed to advise on cashflow questions.

“An accountant can play a key role in helping a start-up, reporting on cash flow on a more regular basis, and understanding the dynamics that drive cashflow,” says Ferguson.

The report found companies that worked with an accountant as an advisor were less concerned about attracting and retaining customers, and were more likely to increase their overall investment in their business strategies.

“Once you’ve got your cash flow healthy, it becomes a question of how to use that and where to invest that to grow my business,” says Ferguson.

Over half, 53%, said they found their accountant advisor provided useful advice on how best to manage the money that flows through their businesses.

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Business Tips – Rise in revenue and business health – Businesses used their accountant as a business advisor

Business Tips - Rise in revenue and business health - Businesses used their accountant as a business advisor

Rise in revenue and business health – Businesses used their accountant as a business advisor

Rose Powell reports in SMEs can make better use of their accountant to boost their bottom line “For the third of business owners who worked with an accountant as an advisor, one in five (21%) saw a rise in their revenue over the last year.” Rose also wrote – “Small business operators who used their accountant as a business advisor last year were 31% more likely to see an earning uplift, according to new research from the 2013 MYOB Business Monitor.

The vast majority of the 1005 business owners surveyed, 89% used an accountant last year.

Only 32% of owners reported having an advisory or consultative relationship with their accountant, compared with the 57% whose relationships were for compliance only, such as tax return completion or GST reporting. Just 11% did not have an accountant…”

Adam Ferguson, general manager of the accountants division at MYOB, told StartupSmart that using an accountant as an advisor was especially valuable for start-up companies.”

“The start-up phase of a business is very different to when it’s up and running. In that phase, your accountant can help with things like creating a business plan, applying for business loans, building out your business case,” says Ferguson.

For start-ups who are already in operational phase, the increasing use of cloud accounting systems enables accountants to provide feedback and ask the right questions about compliance and cash flow.

Ferguson says cloud accounting means compliance is no longer a year-end process, and increasingly a monthly one. This makes them well placed to advise on cashflow questions.

“An accountant can play a key role in helping a start-up, reporting on cash flow on a more regular basis, and understanding the dynamics that drive cashflow,” says Ferguson.

The report found companies that worked with an accountant as an advisor were less concerned about attracting and retaining customers, and were more likely to increase their overall investment in their business strategies.

Once you’ve got your cash flow healthy, it becomes a question of how to use that and where to invest that to grow my business,” says Ferguson.

Over half, 53%, said they found their accountant advisor provided useful advice on how best to manage the money that flows through their businesses.

So talk and work with your accountant – if you need a recommendation, call us for FREE help!

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Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Business Finance 101 – How does the Cashflow Statement Work – Overview for Business Owners

Business Finance 101 – How does the Cashflow Statement Work - Overview for Business Owners

How does the Cashflow Statement Work – Overview for Business Owners

There are 2 popular financial statements that are commonly given for a business – a profit & loss or income statement, a balance sheet or statement of position, but rarely used is the cashflow statement (or statement of cash flows). The purpose of the cashflow statement is to highlight the major activities that directly and indirectly impact cash flows and hence affect the overall cash for the business.

Business owners usually know by “feel” what their cash flow is like, and they should monitor cash for a very good reason – without a sufficient cash balance at the right time, a company can miss golden opportunities or may even fall into bankruptcy. 

The cash flow statement answers questions that cannot be answered by the income statement and a balance sheet. For example a statement of cash flows can be used to answer questions like where did the company get the cash to pay dividend of nearly $14,000 in a year in which, according to profit & loss / income statement, it lost more than $10,000?

The cashflow statement is a valuable analytical tool for business managers as well as for investors and creditors, although managers tend to be more concerned with forecasted statements of cash flows that are prepared as a part of the budgeting process. The statement of cash flows can be used to answer crucial questions such as the following:

  1. Is the company generating sufficient positive cash flows from its ongoing operations to remain viable?
  2. Will the company be able to repay its debts?
  3. Will the company be able to pay its usual dividends?
  4. Why is there a difference between net profit/income and net cash flow for the year?
  5. To what extent will the company have to borrow money in order to make needed investments?

For the statement of cash flows to be useful, it is important to use a common definition of cash. It is also important that a statement be constructed using consistent guidelines for identifying activities that are sources of cash and uses of cash. The proper definition of cash is broadly defined to include both cash and cash equivalents.

Cash equivalents (applicable more for large companies) include short term, highly liquid investments such as treasury bills, commercial paper and money market funds that are made solely for the purpose of generating a return on temporary idle funds. Instead of simply holding cash, most large companies invest their excess cash reserves in these types of interest bearing assets that can be easily converted into cash. These short term liquid investments are usually included in marketable securities on the balance sheet. Since such assets are equivalent to cash, they are included with cash in preparing a statement of cash flows

The 3 sections of cash flow statement (each has an inflow and outflow section):

Business Finance 101 – How does the Cashflow Statement Work – Overview for Business Owners

How does the Cashflow Statement Work – Overview for Business Owners

Operating Activities: (mostly income statement / profit & loss)

Operating activities shows the cash effects of transactions such as –

  • cash receipts from sales of goods and services and
  • cash payments to suppliers and employees for acquisition of inventory, taxes, interest on loans

Investing Activities: (mostly long term assets)

Investing activities generally show long term assets (and sometimes debt/equity securities) which include –

  • sale/disposing of plant, equipment
  • sale of debt or equity securities
  • acquiring plant and equipment
  • acquiring debt or equity securities

Financing Activities: (mostly long term liabilities and equity)

Financing activities involve liability and stock holder’s equity items and include obtaining cash from creditors and repaying the amounts borrowed and obtaining capital from owners and providing them with a return on, and a return of, their investment.

  • Increase in debt / loans taken on
  • Payment/redemption of debt facilities / loans
  • Dividends paid

Next month we will work through an example

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Reckon ONE – How to set up and how to report Taxable Payments Annual Report (TPAR) – and when due?

Reckon ONE – How to set up and how to report Taxable Payments Annual Report (TPAR) – and when due?

Reckon ONE – How to set up and how to report Taxable Payments Annual Report (TPAR) – and when due?

Businesses in the building and construction industries need to know how to report Taxable Payments Annual Report (TPAR) – so how do we set up the Reckon ONE file, how do we generate the report and when is the due date to report?

Here we look at what the 1 Australian Tax Office (ATO) requires and how to 2 Steps to set up and generate a Taxable Payments Annual Report from Reckon ONE software.

1  ATO Requirements

You may need to lodge a Taxable payments annual report by 28 August each year if you are a:

  • Business in the building and construction industry;
  • Government entity;
  • May extend to Couriers and Cleaners.

The Taxable payments annual report reports to the ATO about payments you have made to contractors for providing services. Some government entities also need to report the grants they have paid and payments they make to certain other entities.

Contractors can include subcontractors, consultants and independent contractors.

They can be operating as sole traders (individuals), companies, partnerships or trusts.

See our post HERE, for more ATO detail.

2  Reckon ONE – The steps to set up and generate the report are – (a) Set the system, and then (b) Create the Report

(a)   Set up

  1. Click the “cog” icon at far top right of screen > Settings > Book Settings under General > Ensure all Business/Company info is completed – especially Company Name, ABN, Address, Contact, Phone > Save
  2. Back to Settings > under Tax Settings > General > Are you Registered for Tax? > Yes and fill in options below > Save
  3. Set up Suppliers > Contacts in Left side Menu > Suppliers. For each supplier subject to TPAR (contractors) click its name to open, and at top right, tick Subject to TPAR > Verify ABN left side is best. Save and Close. Repeat for all applicable suppliers.
  4. In transactions – you can tick in each transaction, if subject to TPAR also, and de-select individual transactions if not applicable when generating the TPAR report later.

(b)   Create TPAR Report

  1. Click Tax in Left side Menu > TPAR
  2. There are 3 tabs – All, Draft and Lodged
  3. To start, click Add at top right. Select reporting year required and say NO to Amendment (unless it is)
  4. This gives a list of your TPAR suppliers
  5. Click the arrow on the left of each supplier and you can see all the separate transactions. You can de-select any that don’t apply
  6. Generate File – click this at top right – this generates a TPAR.C01 to upload via the ATO Business Portal – it saves as a Download
  7. Print report form top right, as a record
  8. Email a PDF to the default email (as in your Settings, General, Email Settings)
  9. Once lodged, click LODGED and the TPAR becomes Read only.

For a quick video, go here –

Reckon One TPAR video shot

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