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Business Finance 101 – What is Working capital – and how it can be used

Business Finance 101 – What is Working capital – and how it can be used

What is Working capital – and how it can be used

Working capital is defined as the difference between current assets (CA) and current liabilities (CL) at a specific date. The CA and CL amounts are found on your company’s balance sheet. For example, if your company’s balance sheet has current assets of $150,000 and current liabilities of $120,000 then your company’s working capital is $30,000.

Working Capital = Current Assets – Current Liabilities
Normally we want cash and assets that can be turned into cash within 12 months, such as Inventory, debtors who owe the company etc (ie “Current” means within 12 months) to be GREATER than Current (12 months) Liabilities.

But with a significant amount of working capital, a company can still have a period of cash shortage if its current assets are not turning to cash. As an example, a company with most of its current assets locked up in inventory. Or if a company has a large accounts receivables that are not being collected, but even still, this large working capital situation isn’t much immediate help when you can’t meet the payroll run!

There are also other financial ratios use the working capital components such as the current ratio, quick ratio, accounts receivable turnover ratio, and inventory turnover ratio.

Good management means keeping watch on current assets (receivables and inventory) to keep the cash coming into the bank.

Get a FREE 30 min answer to your query, and FREE ongoing email or phone support – No-one offers as much! Call and you also get FREEAvoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia

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Business Finance 101 – Current Ratio – What is it and what does it show?

Current Ratio – What is it and what does it show?

Business Finance 101 – Current Ratio – What is it and what does it show?

There are several financial ratios including the current ratio which shows the proportion of current assets to current liabilities. The current ratio is known an indicator of a company’s liquidity. Put in another way, it shows when there is a large amount of current assets in relationship to a small amount of current liabilities there is some assurance that the obligations coming due will be paid.
As an example if a company’s current assets are $500,000 and its current liabilities are $250,000 the current ratio is 2:1. If the current assets are $600,000 and the current liabilities are $500,000 the current ratio is 1.2 : 1. Clearly a larger current ratio is better than a smaller ratio in comparison to current liability. Generally, a current ratio that is less than 1:1 indicates insolvency, and the preference is at least 2:1, or over 2.
When benchmarking a company, or comparing your own, it is wise to compare a company’s current ratio to those in the same industry. It is also worth keeping a close look at the trend of the current ratio for a given company over time. Is the current ratio improving over time, or is it deteriorating?
The composition of the current assets is also an important factor. If the current assets are predominantly in cash, marketable securities, and accounts receivable, that is more valuable than having the majority of the current assets in slow-moving inventory.

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

Call 0407 361 596 Aust and also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!


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MYOB / Quickbooks – Tax Tables for 2017 – 2018?

MYOB / Quickbooks – Tax Tables for 2017 - 2018?

MYOB / Quickbooks – Tax Tables for 2017 – 2018?

 

The new tax tables for 2017-2018, have been released. The new tax tables include the removal of the temporary budget repair levy, the increase in Medicare levy low-income threshold, as well as the annual indexation of HELP/SSL/TSL and SFSS.
So employees earning between $394 and $520 per week will be affected, all employees with student loans, as well as those on higher incomes.

tax rates 2016-2017

Last tax year, 16-17 they mainly changed in the level $37,001 – $$87,000 (was up to $80,000) range. The past tax year levels are –

 

tax rates 2016-2017

Does your MYOB software have out of date tax tables, or you know you need them by experience every year. (To find what you have, click Set Up then General Payroll Information. In about the middle is the table date at the start of that tax year it applies to).

Tax tables become out of date nearly each year as tax rates and/or Medicare and HECS thresholds can be changed by the Tax Office (ATO). MYOB only supply new tax tables via full software annual subscription. You can no-longer buy the  latest tax tables separately as many years ago. Users must upgrade to a new version or take out Cover under their support program to receive the latest tables or ‘pay2myob.bin’ file for earlier versions (MYOB) to keep payroll compliant. (If you want assistance to upgrade to the latest MYOB call Paul – 0407 361 596 or email us – info@accountkeepingplus.com.au).

The special MYOB tax file (eg ‘pay2myob.bin’) has been specially formatted so that it disallows any manual edit. Additionally, each version is formatted specially, so you can’t use a tax file formatted for MYOB Version 19 with say Version 16. For the Mac version (AccountEdge®) the tax table file is called “MYOB Tax Tables” or in v9 to 9.6 has a “.tax” extension. Everything else though is the same and all the comments here apply equally to the Mac version.

Note third-party tax tables cannot be used in MYOB 2011 onwards – you MUST have subscription or upgrade. Contact us to discuss your needs, or assistance with upgrades and get our extra BONUSES no obligation. 0407 361 596.

There is a Solution up to MYOB v19.13 and Account Edge 15.5 Third party updated tax tables available for $80 provide a substitute, have been tested by ourselves and work with many prior versions. They are for those who want to continue to use their current versions of MYOB® without the need to upgrade. Note that there is nothing in your license agreement that prevents you using 3rd party tax tables.

Installation is simple. The tables are supplied with easy to follow video and instructions and instantly downloaded after secure credit card  payment in most instances, or will be emailed to you. You also receive a PDF copy of the applicable Aust Tax Office Weekly Tax Table for you to check the accuracy of the calculations. After-sales email support is available for any installation or setup issues you may encounter. If you would like Account Keeping Plus to install for you, we can do by remote desktop – Teamviewer (free software). For $50+GST. Call or email for instructions.

Note NO changes are made to the software. The only changes made are to the tax rates in your company data file that the software calls upon to calculate PAYG Withholding in a pay, when processing payroll. The changes made are not permanent and can be reversed by reloading the tax tables from your current tax table file, simply moving a file in the software folder

These third-party tables are available, which Account Keeping Plus have tested in the software and tested against the ATO tables and work perfectly for us and our clients. To get more details and purchase for your MYOB – click the grey box to the right – “Tax Tables” or CLICK HERE

ATO Tax Tables – PDF’s

For the latest tax tables to download the PDF and keep a copy, or use the Tax Withheld Calculator online all from here.

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / Strategy session today!

Call 0407 361 596 Aust and also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Business Finance 101 – What is Equity?

Business Finance 101 – What is Equity?

Business Finance 101 – What is Equity?

I am asked at times – what is equity? If we deduct Liabilities from the Assets of the Business (at cost value), we are left with Equity. These are listed in the Balance Sheet financial statement. Another way is –

ASSETS – LIABILITIES = EQUITY

Equity is also sometimes used to refer to as ownership of shares in a company.

In a company Balance Sheet it is the amount of money contributed by the owners/share/stock-holders PLUS the Retained Earnings (Profit/Loss of past years).

Also note – because assets like plant and equipment are entered at their COST amount (less GST) the MARKET value of the asset is not represented, unless an adjustment is made (by journal) to reflect change of value (and increase or decrease of asset value are then balanced in a special sale or cost of sale asset account). Hence the Company Market Value may not be the true Market Value, unless the adjustment has been made.

Equity can be called Owner’s Equity – for Sole Proprietors, or Shareholder/Stockholder Equity for a company (usually with more than one director).

Owner’s Equity may consist of several accounts –

1.     Capital

2.     Drawings and

3.     Current Year Net Income/Earnings

Shareholder Equity may consist of accounts such as –

1.   Paid-In Capital

  • Preferred Stock
  • Common Stock
  • Paid-In Capital in Excess of Par Value
  • Treasury Stock (stock re-purchased from shareholders)

2.   Retained Earnings/Net Income 

3.   Less Treasury Stock

Equity is also used in several important ratios that help determine financial health of the business, such as Debt to Equity and Return on Equity.

Need help? Not sure?

Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today! 0407 361 596

Call 0407 361 596 Aust and also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!


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Reckon/Quickbooks – Year End Business Tax Planning – Support to prepare the books/accounts well!

Reckon/Quickbooks – Year End Business Tax Planning – Support to prepare the books/accounts well!

Reckon/Quickbooks – Year End Business Tax Planning – Support to prepare the books/accounts well!

There are plenty of resources to assist you in preparing better books for your accountant, but more importantly for you to have an accurate set of books to UNDERSTAND and gain INSIGHT to MANAGE your business BETTER! Your books and accounts are a treasure-trove of information that tell you about the health of your business and what areas you can work on to improve your business financial results!

Here is End of Financial Year (EOFY) in a simple A B C D!

A.    Time to plan for a good finish for EOFY and here are 14 tips to get started and prepare for 30 June.

B.     Reckon EOFY Guide for small businessdownload the free guide.

C.     A great tool is this calendar where you can select the date to see key compliance tasks and actions that need to be taken (by rival MYOB but a GREAT tool!) – click this image – 

https://www.myob.com/au/small-business/end-of-financial-year

D. Reckon have some other great tips from their blog

1) 2017 is an even bigger year for small business

Based on a recent study by the Council of Small Business Organisations of Australia, small businesses provide half of Australia’s private sector jobs. Australia’s new budget became official on May 9 of this year. It exemplifies Australia’s commitment to supporting small business’ efforts and your contributions to Australia’s economy and its workforce. It aims to decrease small business’ tax burdens and reduce ‘red tape’ complexities. It includes, among other things, a trial run of simplified business activity statements.

It also simplifies the process of reporting GST information. Small businesses will no longer have to report separately on export sales, GST-free sales, capital purchases and non-capital purchases.

In the interest of making Australian businesses able to compete more internationally, the government is also working on a 10-year plan to reduce all corporate businesses taxes to 25%. Australia is also investing lots of dollars into improving its infrastructure, increasing the skills of Australia’s workforce and making utilities more affordable. This, too, should benefit all Australians.

2) What constitutes a small business?

The biggest change in this year’s budget is in the small business turnover threshold limit. Where it used to be $2 million,  it is now $10 million. Many more businesses will be able to access small business concessions this year, including the lower business tax rate of 27.5%. This tax discount will also apply to “sole traders, partnerships and other unincorporated businesses with an annual turnover of less than $5 million.”

Other benefits to qualified businesses include credits and subsidies for government trained interns as well as the hiring of job-ready seekers and those with barriers to employment.

Note: capital gains tax concessions are still limited to a $2 million turnover and unincorporated small business tax discounts are limited to a $5 million turnover. The unincorporated small business tax discount is also being increased to 8 per cent, up to $1,000. Businesses must qualify by meeting turnover and CGT concession eligibility tests.

Also note: in an effort to prevent businesses from diverting income to make the $2 million turnover mark, the law specifies that turnover “needs to be calculated from the ‘aggregated’ amounts . . . of every ‘connected’ or ‘affiliated’ business.”

3) Other tax-time-bewares

As always, be organised, be diligent, be thorough, be legal – and be on time. Keep records of everything (the legal requirement is 5 years); don’t throw out business related receipts and do periodically update expense and account records. A compliant accounting and tax software program is highly recommended for use at tax time and throughout the year. Consider linking your business accounts to your accounting software.

Be sure to include all income (even personal, such as rent collected on personal property investments). Don’t try to claim expenses that aren’t business related – if they’re partially for business, make sure they’re properly pro-rated. For those in the courier and cleaning industries (and others who do cash business) – in the interest of a level competitive playing field and other goals listed above, cash records will be thoroughly vetted.

Be aware of regulations related to personal loans from your business. Read up on Division 7a if you have, or plan to, engage your business in a personal loan.

4) Deductions can be fun . . . as long as they’re legal

Here are a few, among many others. Use your trusted tax software to guide you: operating supplies and expenses, home office supplies and expenses, bad debts (must be written off by June 30), business travel (including non-commuting auto expenses), advertising and sponsorships (time to support your favourite local little league team), charitable contributions, pre-paid expenses (such as insurance premiums, rents and professional subscriptions), super contributions and fringe benefits, bonuses (must be reported to employees in writing by June 30), depreciable assets, equipment and office maintenance, business related education and training, union dues, freighting services, websites & domains, uniforms & protective gear. Ping Pong tables, Xboxes, pedicures and art work– yes, if they qualify.

How’s that sandwich going? Ready for pizza yet? Also tax deductible.

5) A few other really important things to know . . .

  • . . . about SUPERSTREAM: It is the law. Super contributions must be paid electronically and in a single, standardized format “so it can be transmitted consistently across the super system  – between employers, funds, service providers and the ATO. It’s linked to the payment by a unique payment reference number.” Super concessional contribution caps for employees under age 49 have increased from $25,000 to $30,000.
  • . . . about PAYG REPORTING: STP is still optional, but recommended, for small businesses.
  • . . . about FOREIGN WORKERS: Australia’s temporary work visas will herewith be limited to those who fulfill critical skills  shortages. Employers will have to pay a levy that will be earmarked into its new Australian skills development fund, in the interest of training Australians in areas of needed skills.
  • . . . about STOCKS: Stocks can now be valued at year-end cost, market selling value, replacement or obsolete stock value.

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today! 0407 361 596 Aust

***BEFORE you BUY Ask us for a competitive software price BELOW retail – no obligation!

You also get FREE 30 min to assist in setting up your company in the software, and FREE ongoing email or phone support – no-one offers as much!

Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Business Finance 101 – COS or COGS – Cost of Sales or Cost of Goods Sold – What it means

Business Finance 101 – COS or COGS – Cost of Sales or Cost of Goods Sold – What it means

COS or COGS – Cost of Sales or Cost of Goods Sold – What it means

Cost of Sales (COS) or Cost of goods sold (COGS) is the cost of the product that was sold to customers. It includes the cost of materials and direct labour used to produce the goods ready to sell. The cost of goods sold is reported on the profit and loss at the time/period the sales revenues of the goods sold are reported.

A retailer’s cost of goods sold includes the cost from its supplier plus any additional costs necessary to get the product into inventory and ready for sale. For example, a store purchases a book from a publisher. If the cost from the publisher is $60 plus $5 in delivery costs, the store reports $65 in its Inventory account until the book is sold. When the book is sold, the $65 is removed from inventory and is reported as cost of goods sold on the profit and loss.

COGS is usually the largest expense on the profit and loss of a company selling products or goods. Cost of Goods Sold are deducted from the sales/revenue.

Cost of goods sold is calculated in full, as follows:

Cost of beginning inventory + cost of goods purchased (net of any return stock) + freight-in – cost of ending inventory.

This account balance or this calculated amount will be deducted from the sales amount on the income statement, leaving a Gross Profit.

Get a FREE 30 min answer to your query, and FREE ongoing email or phone support – No-one offers as much! Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Xero – Handling Overpayments in Xero

Xero – Handling Overpayments in Xero

Handling Overpayments in Xero

From the Xero blog, here is how to handle overpayments in Xero and resolve them –

Overpayments can be challenging at times, or even forgotten. There are some easy ways to handle overpayments within Xero.

Let’s take a look at a few ways we can record an overpayment and apply this to an invoice/bill or refund it directly. In Xero, the term “invoice” relates to a sale, and a “bill” relates to a purchase. I’ve only referred to invoices below, but these processes relate to both.

To Record (handle) an Overpayment, you can either:

  • Simply enter the amount paid directly onto the invoice, and if the amount exceeds your invoice total, Xero will automatically calculate an Overpayment transaction.
  • Create an Overpayment Receive Money / Spend Money transaction in your bank account
  • During reconciliation, create an Overpayment Receive Money / Spend Money transaction

Allocate or Refund an Overpayment (Resolve the overpayment)

Once the Overpayment transaction has been entered into Xero, a cash refund can be recorded or you can allocate the overpaid amount to an invoice for the same Contact in Xero.

  • The Allocate option will appear in the Overpayment Options drop down menu while viewing your Overpayment transaction.
  • If a contact has a new invoice you created Xero will ask if you wish to allocate the overpaid amount against this invoice.
  • You can record Cash Refunds on the Overpayment directly and then reconcile them with your Bank Statement line.

(XERO) have some great Help Centre pages that step through Overpayments in Xero. You can check them out here, and call us for help!

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today! 0407 361 596 Aust

***BEFORE you BUYAsk us for a competitive software price BELOW retail – No obligation!

You also get FREE 30 min to assist in setting up your company in the software, and FREE ongoing email or phone support – no-one offers as much!

Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia