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Business Finance 101 – 6 MORE! Plus 4 individual tax tips – End of Financial Year tax tips 2018

Business Finance 101 – 6 MORE! Plus 4 individual tax tips - End of Financial Year tax tips 2018

6 MORE! Plus 4 individual tax tips – End of Financial Year tax tips 2018

BUSINESS

1. Get more from your director’s bonus

If you are expecting a pre-30 June bonus, you may be able to sacrifice your pre-tax salary or bonus into super rather than receive it as cash. As with the deductible contributions, this could reduce tax on your salary or bonus by up to 34%, and will allow you to take advantage of the contribution caps that apply in this financial year. Once your money is invested in super, the tax going in is only 15% and also, tax on earnings is capped at 15%, which may compare favourably to investments held in your own name.

2. Pay quarterly/monthly super

Super Guarantee contributions must be paid before 30 June to qualify for a tax deduction in the 2017/18 financial year. You might consider bringing forward the June quarter contribution payments. We recommend allowing plenty of time for it to reach the super funds (5-14 days some funds require).

3. Bad debt review

Review all your bad debtors. Write-off all those you think are unlikely to pay to enable a tax deduction this year. We recommend recording this in the minutes of the business after ensuring that all reasonable steps have been taken to recover the debt.

4. Prepay expenses

Prepaying certain expenses such as rent, repairs and office supplies before year end can reduce your current year tax liability. If payments are due early next financial year, a pre-payment may entitle you to the tax benefit much earlier.  The rules differ depending on the type of entity so please call your tax agent, if you would like more clarification.

5. Stocktake

Trading stock should be reviewed before 30 June, either by a physical count or from a perpetual stock record system. Small Business Entities can be exempt from conducting a yearly stock take if the value of stock has moved by less than $5,000 during the year. Tax is paid on the value of stock at the end of the financial year so consider selling or disposing of slow moving stock so that it is not included in the count.

6. Franking credits

If you are planning on paying dividends out to shareholders before the end of the year, it is worth reviewing the company’s franking account to ensure that the company has paid sufficient tax to enable the dividends to be fully franked. This may mean paying ahead of scheduled payments in an arrangement with the ATO. For assistance with calculating your franking account balance, please talk to your tax agent.

INDIVIDUALS

A. Get a super top up from the Government

If you earn $35,454 – $51,021 pa, of which at least 10% is from employment or a business, and make a personal after-tax super contribution, you could qualify for a Government co-contribution of up to $500. 

B. Boost your partner’s super and reduce your tax

If you have a spouse who earns less than $10,800 pa, consider making an after-tax super contribution on their behalf, and you could receive a tax offset of up to $540.

C. Use super to manage Capital Gains Tax

If you make a capital gain on the sale of an asset this financial year and earn less than 10% of your income from eligible employment, you may be able to claim a tax deduction for a contribution to superannuation, which could reduce or offset your capital gain. You will need to be eligible to contribute to superannuation (which means you are under the age of 65, or under 75 and meeting the work test), and be comfortable having your contribution preserved in super until you meet a condition of release (eg retirement).

D. Make tax deductible super contributions

If you earn less than 10% of your income from eligible employment (eg you are self-employed or not employed), you are generally able to claim a tax deduction for personal contributions to superannuation. As with super, you will need to be eligible to contribute to superannuation (which means you are under the age of 65, or under 75 and meeting the work test), and be comfortable having your contribution preserved in super until you meet a condition of release (eg retirement). If you claim a deduction for it, the contribution you make will be taxed at 15% in your super fund, so your tax saving will be the difference between your marginal rate and 15% – which could be up to 34%.

Get a FREE 30 min answer to your query, and FREE ongoing email or phone support – No-one offers as much!

DOWNLOAD a FREE “Bookkeeping Quarter Checklist” to get organised! CLICK HERE

Or ask a question – Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia

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Business Finance 101– 5 End of Financial Year tax tips 2018

Business Finance 101– 5 End of Financial Year tax tips 2018

5 End of Financial Year tax tips 2018

Time to plan for a good finish for EOFY and here are 5 tips to get started and prepare for 30 June.

1. Consider the ideal timing for asset sales

If you are thinking of selling a profitable asset this financial year, but are likely to earn a lower income in the next year, it may be worth postponing the sale until after 30 June, as the sale is income, less the original cost. However, if you expect an income windfall from 1 July, it may be worth bringing the sale forward. As always, your decisions depend on your expectations for future asset prices, so don’t postpone a sale for tax purposes if you are expecting your investment to fall in value!

2. Pre-pay investment loan interest 

If you have (or are considering establishing) a geared investment portfolio, you can pre-pay 12 months’ interest on your investment loan and claim the cost as a tax deduction in the current financial year.  This can assist to manage cashflow more efficiently, and potentially reduce your income tax liability this financial year.

3. Pre-pay income protection premiums 

If you are employed or self-employed, income protection insurance provides peace of mind about the security of your income in the event you are unable to work due to illness or injury. Premiums for this insurance are generally tax deductible; prepaying your annual premium prior to 30 June will allow you to claim a full year of cover in advance as a tax deduction.

4. Review your debtors and creditors

Review your accounts receivable / trade debtors – who is taking the longest to pay – is debt-collection failing – consider if it is simplest to write off (reverse) the sale and move on with more Profitable clients and prospects. Likewise – who do you owe? Can you pay them by end of year to tidy up your accounts – or if you are struggling – can you negotiate longer terms to keep things open with suppliers and keep the relationship going?

5. Offset capital gains with capital losses 

Generally, if you have incurred capital losses on your investments, you are able to offset these capital losses against any capital gains you have made. You can also use losses you have carried forward from previous years. Remember, income losses can only be offset against income; capital losses can only be offset against capital gains.

DOWNLOAD a FREE “Bookkeeping Quarter Checklist” to get organised! CLICK HERE

Or ask a question – Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Business Finance 101 – What is the Balance Sheet – Example and Definition

Business Finance 101 – What is the Balance Sheet – Example and Definition

What is the Balance Sheet – Example and Definition

An important part of helping our clients at Account Keeping Plus, is to educate and help businesses and bookkeepers to understand what is the Balance Sheet (also known as the Financial Position) and here we give an example and definition.

Definition

The Balance sheet presents a look at a point in time (eg end of month or year) of the assets and liabilities of the business. In other words, it is a picture or summary of what the business has and how it is funded.

There are three areas in the Balance Sheet – Assets Liabilities and Equity –

Assets include bank accounts, petty cash, inventory, debtors or accounts payable, which are also grouped as Current Assets because they turn over in less than 12 months. Long Term Assets show Plant & Equipment and Motor Vehicles.

Liabilities include credit cards and short term loans, creditors or accounts payable, GST, payroll withholding tax, PAYG and super accounts, which are grouped as Current Liabilities as they also turn over in less than 12 months. Long Term Liabilities show business loans and overdrafts, car loans/finance.

Equity is the difference of assets less liabilities. Sometimes known as net worth  or Shareholder Equity.

Example

The Balance Sheet can be likened to a house with a loan. The house has a value (Asset), say $450,000 and if there is a loan (Liability) say of $250,000 there would be a net of $200,000 which is also called Equity or net worth.

Bal Sht like house

In a similar way, a business reports these as the Balance Sheet Assets, less its Liabilities, leaves Equity (Shareholder’s Equity)

Bal Sht summary

Look for future Posts where we will look at important ratios that can be calculated from parts of the Balance Sheet.

What are your thoughts? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

0407 361 596 Aust

DOWNLOAD a FREE “Bookkeeping Quarter Checklist” to get organised! CLICK HERE

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Business Finance 101 – What is a Profit & Loss Statement and what it tells us

Business Finance 101 – What is a Profit & Loss Statement and what it tells us

What is a Profit & Loss Statement and what it tells us

Want to know what is a Profit and Loss Statement? It is one of the main business reports we use, and what it tells us is how the business is going financially (whether you are making a profit or loss for a period) – it is the Profit & Loss Statement or Income Statement or Trading Statement. The statement shows all the sales for a period less the cost of goods (if you sell product) which leaves Gross Profit, then from that all the Expenses (operating or overheads like rent, wages etc) leaves  the Operating Profit (not always reported), then from that less any non-regular income and expenses, gives us the final Net Profit.

bus-profit-loss-diagram

In summary, there are three main levels of profit or profit margins

  • Gross profit (after cost of sales deducted from sales/revenue),
  • Operating profit (sometimes given = after expenses deducted) also known as Pretax profit (before tax and other non-regular items) and
  • Net profit (Final, after tax and other non-regular expenses and income).

Note that “profit”, “earnings” and even “income” are all used interchangeably, and mean the same thing.

When the term “margin” is stated, it can apply to the dollar number for a given profit level and/or the number as a percentage of sales/revenues.

The absolute amount, the dollar amount, is on the Profit & Loss Statement. The net profit margin commonly uses the percentage calculation to provide a measure of a company’s profitability on a historical basis (3-5 years) and in comparison to peer companies and industry benchmarks. The margin is the amount of profit (at the gross, operating, pretax or net level) as a percent of the sales generated.

Get a FREE 30 min answer to your query, and FREE ongoing email or phone support – No-one offers as much!

DOWNLOAD a FREE “Bookkeeping Quarter Checklist” to get organised! CLICK HERE

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Business Finance 101 – What does the accounting equation mean?

Business Finance 101 – What does the accounting equation mean?

What does the accounting equation mean?

The Accounting Equation is used in both small and large business, and gives a financial position of the business – ie its value (also known as equity), after debts/liabilities. The Accounting Equation or financial position is calculated from three items – assets (what it OWNS), liabilities (what is OWES) and equity (the difference between assets and liabilities, or owner’s equity).

The accounting equation is a simple way to understand how these three amounts relate to each other, and written –

Assets – Liabilities = Equity

The accounting equation is also reported another way (eg USA)

Assets = Liabilities + Owner’s Equity for a small business sole proprietor

The accounting equation for a company/corporation is:

Assets = Liabilities + Stockholders’ Equity

So let’s break down what each part is –

Assets are the company’s resources —what the company owns of value – cash, accounts receivable, inventory, prepaid insurance, investments, land, buildings, equipment, and goodwill. From the accounting equation, we see that the amount of assets must equal the combined amount of liabilities plus owner’s (or stockholders’) equity.

Liabilities are the company’s obligations—what the company owes – notes or loans payable, accounts payable, salaries and wages payable, interest payable, superannuation, and income and payroll taxes payable.

Owner’s equity or stockholders’ equity is the amount left over after liabilities are deducted from assets:

Assets – Liabilities = Owner’s (or Stockholders’) Equity. It also reports the amounts invested into the company by the owners plus the cumulative net profit/income of the company that has not been withdrawn or distributed to the owners.

With accurate records, the accounting equation will always be “in balance,” meaning the left side should always equal the right side. The balance is maintained because every business transaction affects at least two of the company’s accounts. As an example, if a company borrows money from a bank, the company’s assets will increase and its liabilities will increase by the same amount. When a company purchases inventory for cash, one asset will increase (inventory) and one asset will decrease (bank paid for the stock). Because there are two or more accounts affected by every transaction, the accounting system is referred to as double entry accounting.

A company keeps track of all of its transactions by recording them in different accounts in the company’s general ledger. Each account in the general ledger is designated as to its type: asset, liability, owner’s equity, sales/revenue, expense, profit, or loss account.

Balance Sheet and Profit & Loss

The balance sheet is also known as the statement of financial position and it reflects the accounting equation. The balance sheet reports a company’s assets, liabilities, and owner’s (or stockholders’) equity at a specific point in time. Like the accounting equation, it shows that a company’s total amount of assets equals the total amount of liabilities plus owner’s (or stockholders’) equity.

The profit and loss or income statement is the financial statement that reports a company’s sales/revenues and expenses and the resulting net profit/income. While the balance sheet reports one point in time (the FINAL Balance at a date), the profit & loss covers the total amount over a time interval or period of time (eg a month). The profit and loss will explain part of the change in the owner’s or stockholders’ equity during the time interval between two balance sheets, as the profit or loss is reported on the balance sheet.

Learn why Profit does not equal Cash HERE

Get a FREE 30 min answer to your query, and FREE ongoing email or phone support – No-one offers as much! Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

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Business Finance 101 – Accounting Standards / Principles (GAAP) – why is it important to have?

Business Finance 101 – Accounting Standards / Principles (GAAP) – why is it important to have?

Accounting Standards / Principles (GAAP) – why is it important to have?

When we do accounting (which is recording the monetary values of financial transactions) there are general rules and concepts that have been developed over many decades that apply. These are called basic accounting standards / principles or guidelines and are the groundwork on which more detailed, complicated, and legalistic accounting rules are based.

In Australia. The Australian Accounting Standards Board (AASB) uses the basic accounting principles and guidelines as a basis for their own detailed and comprehensive set of accounting rules and standards.

There is a phrase “generally accepted accounting principles” (or “GAAP“) which consist of three important sets of rules: (1) basic accounting principles and guidelines, (2) detailed rules and standards issued by AASB, and (3) the generally accepted industry practices.

When a company distributes its financial statements to the owners or the public, it is required to follow generally accepted accounting principles in the preparation of those statements. Further, if a company’s shares are publicly traded, federal law requires the company’s financial statements be audited by independent public accountants. Both the company’s management and the independent accountants must certify that the financial statements and the related notes to the financial statements have been prepared in accordance with GAAP.

GAAP is useful because it attempts to standardise and regulate accounting definitions, assumptions, and methods. Because of generally accepted accounting principles we are able to assume that there is consistency from year to year in the methods used to prepare a company’s financial statements. And although variations may exist, we can make reasonably confident conclusions when comparing one company to another, or comparing one company’s financial statistics to the statistics for its industry. Over the years the generally accepted accounting principles have become more complex because financial transactions have become more complex.

The Accounting Standards (GAAP) are split into various categories eg “Statement of Cashflows”, “Construction Contracts” etc and a list with most recent updates/ pronouncements for Australia can be found HERE.

Get a FREE 30 min answer to your query, and FREE ongoing email or phone support – No-one offers as much! Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Business Finance 101 – What are the key financial ratios that help you understand your business financial health

Business Finance 101 – What are the key financial ratios that help you understand your business financial health

What are the key financial ratios that help you understand your business financial health

With several months of transactions recorded and bank and credit cards and loans reconciled, an important business finance task each month is use the hidden value in your bookkeeping to get key financial ratios to track how the business is going, to understand your business financial health.

To save time, use the reporting features to generate some key margins and ratios. These are like a report card for your business. The most common to monitor are –

  • Gross profit,
  • Net profit,
  • Current ratio,
  • Quick ratio and
  • Debt to equity ratio.

Use the Profit & Loss statementTip – in MYOB choose with YTD (year to date), or in Reckon/Quickbooks, modify to include the YTD. This will automatically give you a percent column that is the amount of Gross Profit or Net Profit as a percent of the total sales at the top. See our Business Profit and Loss Statement and Profit Margins post for more detail to understand more and how to calculate manually.

Then compare to your peers – Do you know what your industry Gross Margin % is?

Call us and we can give you a guide for FREE!

Use the Balance Sheet to look at the next ratios, which give an indication of the health of your business –

Current Ratio = Total Current Assets / Total Current Liabilities

This confirms whether the business has enough current assets to meet payment of its current debts (current refers to assets and liabilities that will fall due within 12 months). It includes inventory value, as this will be turned over in less than 12 months.

Quick Ratio (Acid Test) = Cash + Receivables/Debtors / Total Current Liabilities

This is like current assets without inventory which can take time to sell if a fire sale is needed, and is mostly the liquid assets. The higher the amount the more “Stable” the business is. That is, the higher it is, the longer the company can stay afloat.

Debt to Equity = Debt/Equity

Divide the amount of debt usually total liabilities) by the equity (owner’s or shareholder’s). the lower the better, but some debt can help you grow and is called leverage – debt can be beneficial, but it must be manageable – higher than 1 can be a warning to keep a close eye and manage the debt carefully. See more

The key is to see that huge value lies in your bookkeeping records! The books are and asset not a liability or expense – they are an invaluable source, so use your bookkeeping to get key financial ratios to track how the business is going.

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

Call 0407 361 596 Aust and also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia