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Business Tax Tips –GST Error Correction – How to put it right

Business Tax Tips –GST Error Correction – How to put it right

Business Tax Tips –GST Error Correction – How to put it right

On the Australian Tax Office (ATO) website has information on what to do when you find you have a GST error correction to make – and how to put it right in a way that is easier than revising a prior statement, as well as you can save penalties (see!… the ATO is really NOT your business enemy!)

Correcting GST Errors –

If you make a mistake (that fits the definition of a GST error) when reporting GST on an activity statement, you can correct that error on a later activity statement if you meet certain conditions.

The benefit of correcting a GST error on a later activity statement is that you will not be liable for any penalties or general interest charge (GIC) for that error.

Generally, it is easier to correct a GST error on a later activity statement than to revise an earlier activity statement. Revising an earlier activity statement that contains an error can incur penalties or GIC.

Here are a series of links about correcting GST errors –

o    options for correcting an error

o    definition of a GST error

o    types of GST errors

o    correcting credit errors

o    correcting debit errors

o    how to make corrections on a later activity statement

o    when a credit or debit error cannot be corrected on a later activity statement

o    what is not a GST error

o    example of correcting GST errors on a later activity statement

o    record keeping

o    more information.

Get a FREE 30 min answer to your query, and FREE ongoing email or phone support – No-one offers as much! Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Business Finance 101 – Current Ratio – What is it and what does it show?

Current Ratio – What is it and what does it show?

Business Finance 101 – Current Ratio – What is it and what does it show?

There are several financial ratios including the current ratio which shows the proportion of current assets to current liabilities. The current ratio is known an indicator of a company’s liquidity. Put in another way, it shows when there is a large amount of current assets in relationship to a small amount of current liabilities there is some assurance that the obligations coming due will be paid.
As an example if a company’s current assets are $500,000 and its current liabilities are $250,000 the current ratio is 2:1. If the current assets are $600,000 and the current liabilities are $500,000 the current ratio is 1.2 : 1. Clearly a larger current ratio is better than a smaller ratio in comparison to current liability. Generally, a current ratio that is less than 1:1 indicates insolvency, and the preference is at least 2:1, or over 2.
When benchmarking a company, or comparing your own, it is wise to compare a company’s current ratio to those in the same industry. It is also worth keeping a close look at the trend of the current ratio for a given company over time. Is the current ratio improving over time, or is it deteriorating?
The composition of the current assets is also an important factor. If the current assets are predominantly in cash, marketable securities, and accounts receivable, that is more valuable than having the majority of the current assets in slow-moving inventory.

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

Call 0407 361 596 Aust and also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!


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Bookkeeping – End of Financial year final pay falls in new financial year

Bookkeeping – End of Financial year final pay falls in new financial year

Bookkeeping – End of Financial year final pay falls in new financial year

Client questionJust a quick question. 

We have an employee being paid fortnightly.

Next payment to be made 07/07/2017.  This includes the week 26/6 to 30/6/2017. Does any of this have to be put through in EOFY for 2016/2017?  Or will it be first payment for New year on new tax table?

Solution Payroll is taken as  a cash payment in the accounts – ie WHEN it is paid.

Regardless of what period it covers – it is WHEN it is paid.

So not included in previous tax year.

You can finish your payroll YE17 year, prepare the Payment Summaries – check you include in Gross Payments, any NEW payroll types/categories if you created any during the year.

Then roll forward to new payroll year, and you can process the 7/7/17 payroll that covers end of June days and some of July days.

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia