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Business Tax Tips – 10 End of Financial Year 2016 tips to prepare for 30 June

Business Tax Tips – 10 End of Financial Year 2016 tips to prepare for 30 June

Business Tax Tips – 10 End of Financial Year 2016 tips to prepare for 30 June

Time to plan for a good finish for EOFY and here are 10 tips to get started and prepare for 30 June.

1. Consider the ideal timing for asset sales

If you are thinking of selling a profitable asset this financial year, but are likely to earn a lower income in the next year 2015-16, it may be worth postponing the sale until after 30 June; however, if you expect an income windfall or higher salary from 1 July, it may be worth bringing the sale forward. As always, your decisions depend on your expectations for future asset prices, so don’t postpone a sale for tax purposes if you are expecting your investment to fall in value!

2. Get more from your salary or bonus

If you are expecting a pre-30 June bonus, you may be able to sacrifice your pre-tax salary or bonus into super rather than receive it as cash. As with the deductible contributions, this could reduce tax on your salary or bonus by up to 34%, and will allow you to take advantage of the contribution caps that apply in this financial year. Once your money is invested in super, tax on earnings is capped at 15%, which may compare favourably to investments held in your own name.

3. Pre-pay investment loan interest 

If you have (or are considering establishing) a geared investment portfolio, you can pre-pay 12 months’ interest on your investment loan and claim the cost as a tax deduction in the current financial year.  This can assist to manage cashflow more efficiently, and potentially reduce your income tax liability this financial year.

4. Pre-pay income protection premiums 

If you are employed or self-employed, income protection insurance provides peace of mind about the security of your income in the event you are unable to work due to illness or injury. Premiums for this insurance are generally tax deductible; prepaying your annual premium prior to 30 June will allow you to claim a full year of cover in advance as a tax deduction.

5. Get a super top up from the Government

If you earn $35,454 – $51,021 pa, of which at least 10% is from employment or a business, and make a personal after-tax super contribution, you could qualify for a Government co-contribution of up to $500. 

6. Boost your partner’s super and reduce your tax

If you have a spouse who earns less than $10,800 pa, consider making an after-tax super contribution on their behalf, and you could receive a tax offset of up to $540.

7. Use super to manage Capital Gains Tax

If you make a capital gain on the sale of an asset this financial year and earn less than 10% of your income from eligible employment, you may be able to claim a tax deduction for a contribution to superannuation, which could reduce or offset your capital gain. You will need to be eligible to contribute to superannuation (which means you are under the age of 65, or under 75 and meeting the work test), and be comfortable having your contribution preserved in super until you meet a condition of release (eg retirement).

8. Make tax deductible super contributions

If you earn less than 10% of your income from eligible employment (eg you are self-employed or not employed), you are generally able to claim a tax deduction for personal contributions to superannuation. As with super, you will need to be eligible to contribute to superannuation (which means you are under the age of 65, or under 75 and meeting the work test), and be comfortable having your contribution preserved in super until you meet a condition of release (eg retirement). If you claim a deduction for it, the contribution you make will be taxed at 15% in your super fund, so your tax saving will be the difference between your marginal rate and 15% – which could be up to 34%.

9. Review your portfolio

Review your portfolio and consider a strategic re-allocation of your investments. Consider portfolio allocations – is your portfolio heavily over- or underweight in specific industry sectors or stocks? Are you continuing to carry stocks that have exceeded your price targets or continue to under-perform – this may be an opportunity to re-balance. If you have an SMSF, now is the time to ensure your fund is invested in line with your documented investment strategy – your auditor will be confirming this after 1 July.

10. Offset capital gains with capital losses 

Generally, if you have incurred capital losses on your investments, you are able to offset these capital losses against any capital gains you have made. You can also use losses you have carried forward from previous years. Remember, income losses can only be offset against income; capital losses can only be offset against capital gains.

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

                Call 0407 361 596 Aust and also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

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Business Finance 101 – What does “Non-Cash Expense” mean?

Business Finance 101 – What does “Non-Cash Expense” mean?

Business Finance 101 – What does “Non-Cash Expense” mean?

I received a call and was asked – what does “Non-cash Expense” mean?

Answer – These are expenses that show on the Profit & Loss / Income Statement of the current period, but ACTUAL payment during the period has NOT actually occurred. You don’t actually pay them!

One example of a non-cash expense is depreciation. For example, if a company purchased equipment on for $5,000 cash/credit, then depending on the allowed rate by the ATO, it could have a depreciation expense of $1,000 in each of the next 5 years. Since there is no cash payment of the depreciation write-off in any of those years, each year’s $1,000 of depreciation expense is known as a non-cash expense.

Another example in a large company is amortization of bond issue costs. Perhaps a company incurred costs of $250,000 for professional fees and registration fees in order to issue $10 million in bonds. If the bonds will mature in 10 years, the corporation will defer the $250,000 of bond issue costs to the balance sheet and will then amortize the cost (send part of the cost to expense) at a rate of $25,000 per year. In each year of the bonds’ life, the corporation’s Profit & Loss will report $25,000 of bond issue costs expense which will be a non-cash expense.

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today! 0407 361 596 Aust

***BEFORE you BUY Ask us for a competitive software price BELOW retail – No obligation!

You also get FREE 30 min to assist in setting up your company in the software, and FREE ongoing email or phone support – no-one offers as much! Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia


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Cashflow Tips – 5 tips for better business cashflow

Cashflow Tips – 5 tips for better business cashflow

Cashflow Tips – 5 tips for better business cashflow

One of the things many business find a burden is that cashflow can easily get out of hand and several studies suggest that financial miss-management is one major contributor to business failure. Here are 5 tips to help get cashflow under control – remember it is an on-going monitoring that keeps you on top – measure and tweak, measure and tweak…!

1.  Look at who owes you – WEEKLY – check your debtors/accounts receivable report every week – get onto those tardy payers – send Statements every Fortnight! A month is too big a gap and easy to slip the mind…

2.  Plan for highs and lows 
Be aware of possible lean cashflow patches coming up and plan for them!. Avoid major purchases from your business’ working capital unless you are sure you have cash to cover it. A cashflow budget will help you see this – eg when revenue is down on forecast you expected (eg the average monthly required, or based on same time last year, or certain % growth if that is the current trend).

3. Have finance products working to your benefit
Overdrafts, premium funding, lease facilities and cashflow funding products can all be excellent tools to help boost a business’ cash. Even the business credit card can be a good way to ease the squeeze as long as you are sure the debt can be paid before interest kicks in, which is the best way to handle credit cards!

4. Avoid penalties
Keep on top of taxes and compliance to save the cost of fines… and the stress!

5. Keep your hands out of the till.
Make cash drawings for personal purposes as minimal and follow conservative cashflow forecasts. Take a weekly wage for yourself so it’s easier for the bookkeeper/accountant, and gives stability to regular expenses and drawings so you can PLAN better!

Need help? Not sure? Call for FREE 30min advice / strategy session today!

Call and you also get FREE “Avoid these GST mistakes” – There’s 18 that the Tax Office see regularly – Get them right!

Email info@accountkeepingplus.com.au or call 0407 361 596 Australia